How to feel more confident as an artist

woman in brown scoop neck long sleeved blouse painting
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Angela from straycurls.com says

“confidence is a strong, wonderful feeling you get when you know who you are; no matter what the environment. Confidence is a beautiful feeling because you can be a daisy in a field of roses and still not feel different, ashamed or shy.”

straycurls.com/how-to-be-a-confident-artist-and-keep-drawing/

Not everyone can be confident 100% of the time, as we all have those doubts that creep in from time to time.

When it comes to artistic confidence, Christine Nishiyama writes:

“Artistic confidence allows us to follow our hand and draw what comes naturally to us. Artistic confidence is what allows us to make our own art in our own way, no matter how amazing and different other people’s art is.”

mightcould.com/essays/the-secret-to-building-artistic-confidence/

Being confident in our abilities is what most of us strive for. Every artist, no matter how experienced or not have doubted themselves at some point and probably still do sometimes. I believe that reaching confidence is a lifelong process.

So how do we achieve confidence as an artist?

There are a number of ways we can do this and if we remember them each time we are ready to create a piece of art, it will help us substantially.

1/ STOP COMPARING

If you remember one thing, remember that almost every artist has compared themselves to artists they believe are better and more successful than they are and most of them still do. Start appreciating your own journey because comparing will only bring you misery.

2/ STOP BEING A PERFECTIONIST

We have all done it at some point on our artistic journey. after we have created a piece of art we have tweaked it here and tweaked it there. Then we’ve added a few things here and there and realised that it should have been left well alone because now you have overdone the “finishing touches”.

The best thing to do before adding those final “finishing touches” is to leave it be for a few days and then come back to it with fresh-eyes. Even better, show it to someone for their feedback.

3/ CHALLENGE YOURSELF-GET OUT OF YOUR COMFORT ZONE

This could be as simple as taking a class on something that you are interested in but know nothing about. Even if it doesn’t work out at least you have tried.

You could even start sharing your art more on your social media accounts. Those positive comments that you get will definitely boost your confidence.

Another way to challenge yourself would be to create an art challenge. For example: A week of objects starting with the letter A.

4 REMEMBER REJECTION ISN’T A BAD THING

There will always be critics, but don’t let the criticism put you off. Remember that some people will not get you as an artist, but a lot of people will love you.

Some of the time, the rejection just means that your art is not the right fit at that time.

5/ PRACTICE AND PATIENCE

No one starts out perfect straight away. It takes a lot of practice and patience to become a confident artist. Keep a sketchbook to practice in and don’t give up. Improvements that you will start to notice over time will boost your confidence.

6/ BE A LIFELONG LEARNER

Think of your art as a journey and not a destination. It is a constant learning process. Try and learn new skills and techniques by watching other artists or looking at what they have created. Now ask yourself “how can I create this in my own style and medium?”


It is time to believe in yourself as an artist because if you don’t, then who will?

Keep a notebook and fill it with all the compliments you have been given over time. When you start doubting yourself go and have a read and feel that confidence embrace you.

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2 comments

  1. This is not a subject often discussed, GREAT suggestions. I love painting, but I lack so much confidence because of comparing myself that I rarely even tell my friends that I paint or let alone being an artist!

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